duncandahusky: (huskyface)



image

Breaker (Exile #1), by Kelly Wyre and A.F. Henley

In the wake of several near-cataclysmic events, humanity created the Cure, a DNA-altering antidote to death by disease and old age. But all cures come with side effects: a small percentage of the population develops a wide range of powers, some of which are lethal to others, and some which are lethal to the wielder.

These people are called the Estranged, hunted and shunned, safe only on the Island of Exile. It is here that Kaeva and Eddie meet-and where they set a prophecy in motion, quite possibly sealing their own demise, and even the end of Exile.

Rating: 5 out of 5!

Breaker brings us two flawed, fascinating main characters, but it also brings an amazing world as well. It's a futuristic dystopia where all is well if you are well-off and "natural", that is, receiving only the good aspects of the Cure. For the Estranged, those to whom the Cure has given a frightening array of powers, controllable and not, life is much harder. If lucky, they live on the outskirts of society, fighting for meager crumbs. Those not so lucky just...disappear. Perhaps they are whisked off by the military or the government for research, no one knows. But to be Estranged is to be outcast, unwanted.

In all of this, a small, hidden haven has arisen: Exile, an island off the coast of the United States. Perhaps the government knows of it, perhaps they don't, but it is well-hidden and well-fortified, and populated by Estranged who have fled for its sanctuary.

It is on Exile where we meet Kaeva, a Breaker - a man whose uncontrolled outbursts can send massive jolts of electricity through anything (and anyone) near him when his emotions get the best of him. His Estrangement has made him a loner, bitter and hopeless, fearful of getting close to anyone.

We also meet Eddie, a "richie" with an affluent upbringing whose abilities as a Scanner (he can hear the awful thoughts of those committing terrible acts, but only as they commit them) he has tried to hide all of his life. When discovered he runs, eventually reaching Exile. Eddie is an amazing character. He is naive about the hardscrabble life of the Estranged, yet well-versed in the interplay of adult society, in public and in private.

The book brings Kaeva and Eddie together and the sparks fly, pun intended. Once the setting and characters are established the story is straightforward, but the atmosphere of the story makes it quite an enjoyable journey (and one that had me sniffling through happy tears as well). I can easily imagine Kaeva's isolated little house by the ocean, spartan but homey, the sun warm and the wind blowing. The rest of Exile comes to life for the reader similarly.

Two questions that I ask myself when I finish a book: "Do I want to spend more time with these people? Do I want to learn more about this place?" In the case of Breaker the answer on both counts is an unqualified Yes! I look forward to more from Wyre and Henley and the fascinating world of Exile.

Originally posted 19 January 2017

duncandahusky: (huskyface)

Infected: Paris (Infected Book 0.5) by Andrea Speed

Infected: Prey (Infected Book 1) by Andrea Speed

Infected: Bloodlines (Infected Book 2) by Andrea Speed

Rating: 5 out of 5 for the series (so far)

In the 1960's a virus was loosed that killed hundreds of thousands of people worldwide. A vaccine was created, but the vaccine had...side effects. For those "infected" with the virus, five days out of every month they transform into a feral feline - cougar, lion, leopard, panther, or tiger. This is not a neat transformation, either:  it can take an hour or more, and is excruciatingly painful as all of the bones break, the body is re-formed, and mass is redistributed. The bigger the feline, the greater the toll it takes on the body, so while there are many cougars, tigers have a diminishingly short lifespan.

Roan McKichan is an oddity. Where almost all other infecteds caught the virus later in life, he was born with the virus and somehow lived when all other virus children usually die shortly after birth. A former cop and now a private detective, he is coming to an understanding with the lion inside him and becoming something the world has never seen before.

To say these books blew me away would be an understatement. Andrea Speed has created a world that is mesmerizing, and populated by unforgettable characters. Roan, first and foremost, is an utter smartass to anyone and everyone, with a history that explains why he must put up a tough-guy image to shelter his more caring and thoughtful self.

His boyfriend Paris, a tiger strain, is wonderful as well. He is cheerfully manipulative, taking advantage of his good looks and charisma any way that he can. Now, though, he has turned his life around and is, as they say, using his powers for good. The banter between these two is a joy to read, as they fall in love and quickly establish a cozy relationship both at work and at home. The side characters can be a little stereotypical (Roan's gruff cop friend for instance), but that is easily overlooked.

I read these books slightly out of order (Prey, Paris, Bloodlines) and I think that that is probably a good way to do it. Prey is actually two novellas put together, though they complement each other well. It is a great introduction to the world of Infected, and the reader quickly gets a feel for the flow Speed's writing. If I had one complaint it would be the sudden changes in point of view in the narration, jumping from Roan to Paris and back (and in one chapter to a tertiary character altogether!).

Paris is a prequel to Prey, showing how Paris and Roan met and fell in love. It provides great backstory for the two, and really allows you to become invested in the characters. The downside to this is when you get to Bloodlines. Here, the tiger strain is catching up to Paris, and even as Roan tries to maintain normalcy and carry on their lives, there is no denying that Paris is dying. I won't kid you - there is no happy ending here. Even so, it's some of the most powerful writing I've come across lately. Yes, I was a weeping mess, and yet the trip was utterly worth it.

I take heart that this is just the start to the Infected series. There are six more books, plus various novellas and short stories. Normally I would look at such a sprawling series in askance and wonder if the author is diluting the stories as they go, but from what I have read I have every faith that all of these will be excellent and enjoyable reads.

Finally, one last note: Although I came by these books through the M/M Romance genre, they are so much more than that. This is Urban Fantasy where the characters happen to be gay and have gay relationships. The bedroom door is closed in this series, which is to say that any sexytime takes place off-page. If the idea of romances has ever put anyone off, this is a great place to start to see what you’ve been missing!
duncandahusky: (huskyface)


Six months after starting their hunt for a serial killer who is still at large, FBI agents Jerry Lee Parker and John Flynn are partners in every sense. But Jerry has serious doubts about their relationship and whether they would even be together if not for the way Flynn changed after touching a mysterious artifact in a museum.

Flynn hates the extraordinary power bestowed on him by the artifact and wants nothing more than to have a normal life again. Jerry fears that without the unusual connection they forged, Flynn will no longer want or need him. Chasing after a similar artifact takes them back to Flynn's old stomping grounds in Washington D.C., where his newfound abilities uncover long-buried secrets, the kind people would kill to protect. But they aren't the only ones looking for these powerful relics, and what they discover will threaten their relationship-and their lives.

Walk a Mile (The Sixth Sense #2) by Sarah Madison

Rating: 2.75 out of 5

This book starts with an interesting premise, carried over from the first book: two FBI agents, one of whom has accidentally acquired telepathic powers, fall together into a steamy relationship. Where do they go from here? How can this expand communication between them? Bet they could apply this to cracking tough cases, right?

Yeah, none of this happens. I feel like the premise is squandered in favor of further complicating matters. Flynn is an uncommunicative dick, and Parker has relationship interruptus. This is one of those frustrating books where so much could be sorted out if the characters just TALKED to each other. Instead (spoiler alert, though this happens early enough it comprises most of the book), a new artifact is introduced, and when they both touch it, Parker and Flynn switch bodies. Hilarity ensues!

OK, not really. Actually, confusion and angst ensue, and ever-increasing failures in communication. We get no closer to figuring out what the story is behind the artifacts. There is no character development, really. And in the end, an even-more unbelievable plot twist is introduced that blows the entire premise up anyway. Even though there is a sequel, I'm pretty much done here.

duncandahusky: (huskyface)

Werewolf at the Zoo, by Charlie Richards

Helping his brother escape the zoo, Rainy discovers more than just an array of animals.

Rainy scouts the zoo, planning a mission to rescue his brother, who’d been sold by poachers while in wolf form. He gets a whiff of the most intoxicating scent, the man Travis Carlyle, his mate. But he quickly finds out that before he can claim the handsome veterinarian, Rainy has to convince Travis that he’s worth coming out of the closet for.

Travis leads a quiet, discreet life, avoiding any situation that could possibly out him to his family. After so many years alone, Travis finds the love, affection, and acceptance Rainy offers him too hard to resist. But just when he decides Rainy might be worth the persecution of revealing his sexuality, he discovers Rainy has been keeping secrets, a lot of secrets: Werewolves, Shifters, Mates? When he watches a shift with his own eyes, Travis is forced to accept the truth.

Too bad not everyone wants Travis to know the wolves’ secrets, tossing him into a feud between shifters. When Travis’s father tries to come between them, can Rainy convince Travis to choose a dangerous, love-filled life with him instead of the comfortable, quiet existence he’s led with his family?

Rating: 2 out of 5

This wasn't a story as much as it was a checklist of werewolf m/m romance tropes. We've got your insta-love, fated mates, "I know you by smell", silly alpha pack dynamics, biting during sex, and so on and so on. Add in some paper-thin homophobia, ridiculously quick acceptance of the impossible, subplots that go nowhere, and stunningly unlikely coincidences. The whole thing was topped off at the end with a lovely scene of, "It's a shame that I just had to rip that guy's throat out with my teeth. Hey, the steaks I was cooking look like they're done. Who's hungry?" Oh, and don't get me started on the overdone Irish dialect. Ugh.

Let's do the math:
+1 star because it wasn't so awful that I couldn't make it to the end
+1 star since it had werewolves. Because werewolves.
+0.5 stars for having sentences with subjects, verbs, and direct objects, and a minimum of typos.
-0.5 star for either ignoring the need for lube or using soap as lube. Ow. Just ow.

2 stars it is! Oh, and add one eyeroll for pretty much setting up the next book and telegraphing the plot for it in a single paragraph. I will not be pursuing the rest of this series.
duncandahusky: (huskyface)


Blood Howl (Sanguis Noctis #1), by Robin Saxon & Alex Kidwell

Gun for hire Jed Walker doesn’t figure it for a difficult job—a simple smash and grab retrieval—except his new client doesn’t want money or goods. He wants shy, gorgeous Redford Reed, a man who turns Jed’s world upside down inside a day. He is in no way prepared to fall hard and fast for his newest assignment.

Redford Reed lives his life locked in his grandmother’s house, haunted by a terrible curse and watching the world pass him by until Jed shows up, sent by a man who will stop at nothing to claim Redford as his own. Teaming up with Jed is Redford’s only chance at survival, but as the violence escalates, so does the tension between them. Even though they each finally have something to live for, now it’s going to take all Jed’s skill and every bit of courage Redford has just to stay alive.

Rating: 4 out of 5

You know those movies where you know going in that you'll really enjoy it as long as you check your brain at the door? I'm thinking action movies, superhero movies, that sort of thing. Big dumb fun. Sure, there's massive plot holes, but damn the movies can be fun!

This is what we have here, in book form.

Normally I'd knock this book on a number of counts: no world-building, little backstory on the main characters, ridiculous motivations by the antagonists, and more. But you know what? The story was so much fun and I enjoyed the characters so much, I will give it a pass.

Jed is pretty much a boisterous, amoral, grade-A asshole. Need someone assassinated, somebody kidnapped, something blown up? He's your guy. This kind of broad character can be entertaining as long as you don't examine them too closely. Redford is a perfect foil for Jed. He's sheltered, naive, and quiet, an element of sweetness that is the perfect antidote to Jed's crassness. The two of them together are an adorable couple. Also, some of the werewolf scenes are flat-out hilarious.

As noted above, don't think about the plot too closely. Just go along for the ride and have a good time! Saxon and Kidwell's writing is enjoyable. The dialogue is snappy and the side characters are for the most part interesting. The big finale is definitely big, and has some intriguing plot twists that make future books in the series quite interesting indeed. I'm definitely continuing to read the series!
duncandahusky: (huskyface)


A proposal turned political…
Detective Oliver Worth doesn’t always think things through. When he proposed to Connor Pierce in front of all the packs of Logan’s Court, he thought he was being romantic. It was a grand gesture to show Connor he meant it—that they were Fated, that Oliver wanted to spend the rest of his life with Connor. He didn’t think he was proposing a bond that would unify the Courts of Logan and Nimueh, forever solidifying peace between the two kingdoms. If he had, maybe he would have expected the fallout.

Marked a murderer…
When Oliver and Connor’s bonding ceremony is interrupted by news of a murder—with Connor the prime suspect—Oliver and Connor are forced to disappear into hiding in Maeve’s Court. With a dwindling list of allies, they must race to solve the murder and clear Connor’s name. But with every passing moment, the political landscape of the Three Courts shifts toward destabilization and war, with Connor and Oliver at the centre of it all. As the evidence mounts against Connor, and the Courts prepare for all-out war, the case gets more convoluted. Is Connor being framed for murder? Is the murder only one part of a much larger plan? And with Connor presumed guilty across the Three Courts, how far does the conspiracy stretch?

A grasp for power…
The road ahead is more treacherous than Oliver ever imagined. As he pushes to find answers and save his lover, Oliver must hold desperately to the belief that he and Connor really are meant to be. Can they work fast enough to find the real killer and save their Courts from all-out war? Or will their Fated love be Fated to die?

Worth the Wait (Worth #3), by Lyra Evans

Rating: 5 out of 5

This is a great way to cap an extremely enjoyable series! Having established the characters and the setting well in previous book, Evans is free to dive deeply into the characters and the world of the Three Courts. The political machinations take center stage here, as does a pretty clever mystery.

We (finally!) learn both Oliver and Connor's family histories, and that plays a big part in the story. The heat and passion between these two is there as always, though the on-page hotness is toned down from previous books. The fast-paced story more than makes up for this though as our heroes traverse one end of the Three Courts to the other seeking to clear their names.

As always, the side characters shine here, from the stalwart Donna, Connor's second in command, to the wild and fearless reporter Rory. The small side-plot involving border guard Brook was sweet and sad, and not something I had noticed in previous books.

I enjoyed this book so much. I'm sad to leave Oliver and Connor but the ending of their story is so perfect I have no complaints whatsoever!

(Side note: That cover...ugh. I mean, at least they're consistently bad throughout the series, so I guess there's that.)

duncandahusky: (huskyface)

Detective Oliver Worth is still new to the whole 'relationship' thing. He spends every moment of his free time in Logan's Court with Connor, then slips over the border to Nimueh's Court to get back before dawn. It's exhausting, but it works. After all, Oliver's still closeted, and the Nimueh's Court Police Department is hardly the most welcoming of places.

Connor Pierce, on the other hand, feels differently. When he asks Oliver to begin a public courting tradition, Oliver panics and runs back to Nimueh's Court to think things through. The problem is someone has already made the decision for him. Now he's the butt of every officer's joke, and his Captain must disclose his relationship to the Commissioner. Oliver's sure his life can't get any more messed up.

But when a call comes in asking Oliver to consult on a murder back in Logan's Court, Oliver is forced to accept the reality that things have only started to fall apart. With Connor mourning and desperate to find the killer, Oliver barely has a chance to deal with his true feelings about going public. Worse, the case has virtually no evidence and no leads. Having no options and the threat of more deaths around the corner, Oliver gives in and calls for a Special Investigator to help. Only the Investigator they send is the last person Oliver wants.

Now Oliver isn't just dealing with a dangerous murderer, he's facing a past he'd long-since buried and the slow crumble of his first real relationship in years. Can Oliver weather the storm of his fears and unresolved feelings to move forward and give Connor what he needs? Or will the past destroy every possibility of Oliver and Connor's future?

Rating: 5 out of 5

Having dispensed with the majority of the character introductions in the first book of the series (Worth a Shot), this book has time to tell a great story with a tricky mystery as well. Oliver's mixed emotions toward relationships make sense in the context of his past, which we learn more about here. It's painful to see his world blow up in his face, though I could wish more time would be spent on the repercussions of this.

Instead, it's back over to Logan's Court, submerged in a werewolf culture that Oliver knows little about and struggles to learn on the fly. The tension of the mystery ramps up throughout the book, and in the meantime Connor and Oliver try to sort out where they stand. A big hazard in a story like this is that one part of the story or the other can take over the book. Here, the mystery and relationship development are given a proper amount of weight, as is the interaction between them. As with the first book, I could wish to know more about Connor's past - maybe this will be addressed in the third and final book, Worth the Wait.

I really enjoy Evans' minor characters here. The inscrutable Donna, the irritating-yet-alluring Sky, and even the border guards are fun and interesting. This helps create a more complex world that draws the reader in. And as before, the intimate times between Oliver and Connor are incredibly sexy. The settings are a bit offbeat, but that definitely kept this reader's interest.

(And again...ugh, that cover. It still has no relation to how I picture the characters, but whatever...)

duncandahusky: (huskyface)


Worth a Shot (Worth #1) by Lyra Evans

Detective Oliver Worth has everything he needs-the job he always wanted and a knack for picking one-night stands. When a high-born Witch is found murdered on the steps of Nimueh's Court, Oliver is given the case of the century-because no one else will touch it. Not when it looks like the murder was committed by a Werewolf.

The Treaty between the Courts of Nimueh and Logan has stood for over a hundred years, and peace was hard-won. If a Werewolf is responsible, the murder counts as an act of war and would plunge both kingdoms into chaos. Something Oliver's Captain is keen to point out.

Treading lightly, Oliver has no choice but to venture alone into Logan's Court to investigate. The trail of clues leads right to Connor Pierce, a newly minted Alpha of Logan's kin. Connor is gorgeous and captivating and absolutely a suspect. Determined to do his job and catch the killer, Oliver finds he's now got more to worry about than an inter-kingdom war. He tries to ignore his growing desire, but Connor keeps drawing him in. Everything about Connor is intoxicating, and Oliver isn't sure how long he can fight off temptation...

Now there's not just the peace of two kingdoms on the line-there's also his heart.

Rating: 5 out of 5

Now, I appreciate hot, steamy scenes in my reading as much as the next gay guy, but I prefer for a book to be plot- or character-driven, and the intimate stuff is a nice garnish. This book though...wow. The overall plot is OK, and the characters are interesting. But the level of heat throughout most of this book is incredible, and not even particularly explicit.

Oliver is quite a complex character - open about his sexuality in the off hours, but deeply closeted in a professional setting. Although we don't get a whole lot of backstory on any of the characters in this book (maybe in the sequels?) we learn enough about Oliver to understand what makes him tick. Connor is more of a cipher, but that is by design. We learn about the werewolf society (Logan's Court) bit by bit as Oliver does. One thing that is very clear - sex and sensuality are very much integral to the wolves and their interactions.

The world-building is nicely done here as well. This is a society where magic exists and is a fact of life. Dirty clothes are taken care of by laundry wards, and cocktails are served with anti-intoxication potions mixed in. At the same time, there are cars, computers, and cell phones. The setting is built organically - not a whole lot of exposition going on. This doesn't always work for me, but it definitely fit in here. Also, although this is ostensibly a shifter story, very little of this plays into the plot except to define the different societies (and associated prejudices).

A large portion of the book is taken up by Oliver needing to pose as Connor's consort to interview a key witness. As a plot device it's a little flimsy, but the attraction, temptation, and intimate pas-de-deux between Connor and Oliver is hotter than hell and kept my attention throughout! The mystery is resolved nicely and while the ending is a bit unexpected (in a good way) it sets the stage for future stories, although this book is self-contained.

I liked this one a lot. Recommended!

(Side note: Ugh, that cover. I know I’m not the target demographic but that’s over the top. The way these guys are described, neither of them works out or does anything that would be necessary to maintain ridiculous chiseled abs like that. Ah well...)
duncandahusky: (huskyface)

Special Agent John Flynn is everything Jerry Parker is not: dangerously handsome, coolly charismatic, and respected by his peers. Special Agent Parker is dedicated and meticulous, but his abrasive personality has given him a reputation for being difficult. When new information on a cold case appears, Parker is assigned to work with Flynn, and the sparks fly as their investigative styles clash. Contact with a strange artifact changes everything when it bestows unusual and unpredictable powers on Flynn... and the two men must learn to trust each other before a killer strikes again.

Rating: 4 out of 5

When I started into this I didn't realize that it's short enough to almost be a novella. While that's not necessarily a bad thing, it does explain some of the issues I had with the story. I could wish for more backstory on Flynn, and the "mystery" was rather perfunctory, making it clear that the purpose of this book was to establish the characters first and foremost.

The book is a fast, fun read though. The introduction of The Artifact gives an interesting spin to the usual cops-who-don't-get-along-become-friends (or more) trope. Flynn getting used to managing his newfound skills does give some interesting insights into his personality. Parker is genuinely likeable, and the ease with which he provides help for Flynn makes sense given his personality is established as someone who is supportive in all of his roles. Points also for the narrative gymnastics in the latter part of the story, drawing out the tension and leaving the reader guessing.

I see that the sequel to this book (Walk a Mile) is double the length in pages, which is a good sign. I will definitely be picking that up!
duncandahusky: (huskyface)


Wolf, in League (Wolf, Book 3), by A.F. Henley

Rating: 4.5 out of 5

Wolf, in League follows the progression of Wolf, WY (a local setting), then Wolf, en Garde (a national setting), by expanding the story of wolves, vampires, and more to world-wide in scope, and it does it in grand style.

I will say up-front that vampires simply don’t interest me. Werewolves, heck yeah – vampires, zombies, and other undead things, not so much. Setting aside that preference, though, the relationship between Matthew and Gavin is wonderful to watch develop. I found Matthew extremely relatable, although it didn’t hurt that the story is told mostly from his point of view. Even so, he’s a complex, intelligent, and thoughtful  character.

Gavin is a bit harder to read (intentionally so), and if I have any complaint it would be that it would be nice to know more of his history. I could see how that could slow the overall story down, though. Much of his behavior is attributable to his affliction, but as the story plays out we find there is much more to it than that.

I liked that Matthew takes time to come to grips with his feelings towards Gavin. He’s forced into a difficult situation and being pulled in multiple directions. The rush of feelings when the dam breaks, though, is gratifying. I can’t say that I found Matthew and Gavin as sympathetic a couple as Vaughn and Randy or Lyle and Rafe, but that could be due to the whole vampire thing.

One thing I loved about this book is that the story moves along at a steady clip. Starting within the familiar setting we left at the end of en Garde, step by step we learn that the world is a much scarier place than originally thought. There are conspiracies on multiple fronts and it is up to the characters, new and old favorites, to uncover them. This all builds to a conclusion that creates a whole new setting for future books – books that I definitely look forward to reading!

Side note: huge props for dropping “Not all vampires” into the dialogue, too (vampsplaining?). This cracked me up so much!

duncandahusky: (huskyface)

Wolf, en Garde (Wolf #2) by A.F. Henley (with fabulous cover design by Drawboy)

Three years ago Lyle made a mistake that cost him his freedom, and almost his life. Now, sick to death of watching his father love the man that Lyle wanted, Lyle accepts an offer to leave Wolf, WY behind and see what life in Washington, D.C. can do for him instead.

When Lyle comes across a seductive, attractive stranger with a fascinating yet terrifying view of humanity, he’s more than intrigued. It doesn’t take Lyle long to realize that Arius isn’t just playing games, though, and when Lyle runs across a secret in Arius’ lair he has no choice but to flee, even knowing his actions will enrage Arius.

On the run, with only a psychic’s second sight and his own instinct to help him, Lyle has nowhere to go but home. The only question is, will they have him when he shows up.


Oh my gosh, this book. I love it when an author only gets better through a series, and these books are an excellent example of this. My review of the first book in the series, Wolf, WY, was that it was a 4 out of 5, a pretty good book indeed. This one? 5 out of 5, and with good reason. All the issues and concerns that I had by the end of the first book were addressed to my satisfaction in the first few chapters of this one, making Wolf that much more of a satisfying story.

Wolf, en Garde takes up the story of Lyle, a werewolf fighting his way through a difficult time in his life. As he goes off to the big city he finds excitement and some very nasty surprises. I love the fact that although Lyle goes from an initially annoying and petulant character to a sympathetic one by the end of the book, you can always see where he is coming from and what is motivating him.

The plot twists here are great fun, with shifting alliances and shadowy hints of people knowing more than they should. Even better, Henley takes the cozy setting of Wolf, Wyoming from the first book and expands it out with some excellent world building, showing where werewolves (and other beings) fit in modern society and suggesting even greater manipulating forces that the characters still don’t know about. I see it as a narrative tool akin to the blind men and the elephant. As each new piece of information presents itself you are forced to reformulate your view of the world. The slow reveal makes for a great read, though. After a slow buildup, the last part of the book is a hell of a ride!

This book obviously leads directly into the next in the series, Wolf, in League. I will be starting in on that immediately! I definitely recommend the whole series.
duncandahusky: (huskyface)


Wolf, WY, by A.F. Henley

There's nothing like a fresh start, and for Randy, still nursing wounds left by a cheating ex and harboring a deep mistrust for all things corporate, Wolf, Wyoming seems like the perfect place to start over. Secluded, quiet, and self-sufficient, Wolf is bound to not only inspire, but to bring Randy the peace he needs. The view's not bad, either.

Vaughn O'Connell and his family are Randy's only neighbors for miles, and while Randy knows it's somewhat unlikely that a man with three kids is gay, it doesn't hurt to look. When a misunderstanding brings Randy face to face with both Vaughn and his eighteen year old son, Lyle, Randy's not sure what to feel about either of them.

But things are not what they appear in Wolf, and the closer Randy gets, the stranger the O'Connell family seems...
Rating: 4 out of 5

This was a really enjoyable book. The setup was good, and I enjoyed the characters. Randy is a funny, snarky guy who is prone to wisecrack at wholly inappropriate times (a man after my own heart!). Vaughn is a crusty local, grumpy but endearing in the end. The setting is lovely too - the descriptions of the area led me to Google Maps and using Street View to get a good look at the surrounding area. Oddly enough this actually allowed me to better appreciate the story.

The expected conflict between the normal and paranormal worlds is present, but Henley also adds an interesting interpersonal additional conflict that is a unique spin in what I have seen in the genre. This helps to elevates what might have been a pretty standard story into something memorable.

Unfortunately, at times the prose could be somewhat overly-florid. This was forgivable, but there were some other flaws that jumped out as well, including a scene that very obviously exists primarily to set up the rest of the series. Also, it would have been nice to know more of Vaughn's backstory. Despite these things, though, I found this to be a quick, enjoyable, and engaging read.
duncandahusky: (huskyface)


Into This River I Drown, by T.J. Klune

At once an exploration of grief and faith, Into This River I Drown is one man’s journey into the secrets of his father and discovering the strength to believe in the impossible.

Five years ago, Benji Green lost his beloved father, Big Eddie, who drowned when his truck crashed into a river. All called it an accident, but Benji thought it more. However, even years later, he is buried deep in his grief, throwing himself into taking over Big Eddie’s convenience store in the small town of Roseland, Oregon. Surrounded by his mother and three aunts, he lives day by day, struggling to keep his head above water.

But Roseland is no ordinary place.

With ever-increasing dreams of his father’s death and waking visions of feathers on the surface of a river, Benji’s definition of reality is starting to bend. He thinks himself haunted, but whether by ghosts or memories, he can no longer tell. It’s not until the impossible happens and a man falls from the sky and leaves the burning imprint of wings on the ground that he begins to understand that the world around him is more mysterious than he could have possibly imagined. It’s also more dangerous, as forces beyond anyone’s control are descending on Roseland, revealing long hidden truths about friends, family, and the man named Calliel who Benji is finding he can no longer live without.

Rating: 5 out of 5

Staggering. What T.J. Klune does with this book is simply staggering and damn near overwhelming.

The atmosphere and emotions in Into This River... are just as much central characters as Benji and Cal. By the end of the book, I could imagine standing at Mile Marker 77 and knowing what it looks like, how it feels. The grief, pain, hope and love experienced here damn near leave me speechless. As always, I am amazed at the depth of feeling that T.J. Klune can evoke with his writing.

This is a weighty book, and definitely not an easy read (at least it wasn’t for me). I had to take a break and read something a bit lighter every now and then! That said, it was extremely rewarding. I would urge any reader to stick it out through the halfway mark, because the latter half of the book is one hell of a ride.

I am glad that I have read other books by Klune before reading this one. Many of the themes (and indeed phrasing) featured in Wolfsong are repeated here, though this does not detract in the least - rather, I feel it allows a glimpse into the author’s thinking.

I highly, highly recommend this book. Simply incredible.

Side note: Damn, that book cover design. It's perfect, and captures the story well.

July 2017

S M T W T F S
      1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 2526272829
3031     

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Jul. 28th, 2017 06:57 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios